Eating City at Italian Senate

to present financial trends in school public food services

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Credits: FoodInsider.it

Award-winning American Chef

Jamilka Borges to cook at #EC_SC2018!

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The 2018 Summer Campus

The selection results are out!

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Public Food Services

as a leverage for Sustainable Food Systems

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Linking Producers & Consumers

Building innovative food systems and supply chains that can connect producers and consumers

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Credits: Photo Credit EIP-AGRI

“Building innovative food systems and supply chains that can connect producers and consumers”

Humans have through their actions and inactions almost put into danger every other species and now try battling to save themselves just like the satire given in the use of the Nile perch. I compare the excellent narrative and analysis of The Ecology of Law to be a recapitulation of the climate of fear we are almost loosing energy to resist.

The two excellent scholars maintain that while the rhetoric of science and jurisprudence may bind people together it could also blind them. They vehemently belief in the restoration of dignity particularly to the dispossessed people via collaborative networks among all stakeholders especially scientists and legal scholars. They consider peaceful intellectual and collaborative negotiations and participation to be the solution at the heart of our ecological crises.

Finding any solution to the already uncontrolled ‘ecological crises’ as the authors prefer to express it, must come first under science and law and others only secondarily. They call to convergence between the “law of nature and the law of man” to combat today’s global ecological crises and prevent that of the future.

Modernity pays more attention to market without fundamentally given consideration to where the products are coming from and how they should be used to regenerate more. Law should not be seen as a means of violence or power but rather it should solidify the cultural and traditional lives of the people and make them sovereign. Only in this way, the commons could be generative.

The Ecology of Law sufficiently and aptly presented how better institutions could lead to better ecology and stronger people.

Calling for a convergence between the law of Nature and the law of Mankind

"From seeing the world as a machine to understanding it as a network of communities"

Humans have through their actions and inactions almost put into danger every other species and now try battling to save themselves just like the satire given in the use of the Nile perch. I compare the excellent narrative and analysis of The Ecology of Law to be a recapitulation of the climate of fear we are almost loosing energy to resist.

The two excellent scholars maintain that while the rhetoric of science and jurisprudence may bind people together it could also blind them. They vehemently belief in the restoration of dignity particularly to the dispossessed people via collaborative networks among all stakeholders especially scientists and legal scholars. They consider peaceful intellectual and collaborative negotiations and participation to be the solution at the heart of our ecological crises.

Finding any solution to the already uncontrolled ‘ecological crises’ as the authors prefer to express it, must come first under science and law and others only secondarily. They call to convergence between the “law of nature and the law of man” to combat today’s global ecological crises and prevent that of the future.

Modernity pays more attention to market without fundamentally given consideration to where the products are coming from and how they should be used to regenerate more. Law should not be seen as a means of violence or power but rather it should solidify the cultural and traditional lives of the people and make them sovereign. Only in this way, the commons could be generative.

The Ecology of Law sufficiently and aptly presented how better institutions could lead to better ecology and stronger people.

Calling for a convergence between the law of Nature and the law of Mankind

"From seeing the world as a machine to understanding it as a network of communities"

Humans have through their actions and inactions almost put into danger every other species and now try battling to save themselves just like the satire given in the use of the Nile perch. I compare the excellent narrative and analysis of The Ecology of Law to be a recapitulation of the climate of fear we are almost loosing energy to resist.

The two excellent scholars maintain that while the rhetoric of science and jurisprudence may bind people together it could also blind them. They vehemently belief in the restoration of dignity particularly to the dispossessed people via collaborative networks among all stakeholders especially scientists and legal scholars. They consider peaceful intellectual and collaborative negotiations and participation to be the solution at the heart of our ecological crises.

Finding any solution to the already uncontrolled ‘ecological crises’ as the authors prefer to express it, must come first under science and law and others only secondarily. They call to convergence between the “law of nature and the law of man” to combat today’s global ecological crises and prevent that of the future.

Modernity pays more attention to market without fundamentally given consideration to where the products are coming from and how they should be used to regenerate more. Law should not be seen as a means of violence or power but rather it should solidify the cultural and traditional lives of the people and make them sovereign. Only in this way, the commons could be generative.

The Ecology of Law sufficiently and aptly presented how better institutions could lead to better ecology and stronger people.

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